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Olesen SS. et al., 2020: Combined extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and endoscopic treatment for pain in chronic pancreatitis (SCHOKE trial): study protocol for a randomized, sham-controlled trial

Olesen SS, Drewes AM, Gaud R, Tandan M, Lakhtakia S, Ramchandani M, Rao GV, Reddy DN, Talukdar R.
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre for Pancreatic Diseases, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. .
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre for Pancreatic Diseases, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Asian Institute of Gastroenterology, Hyderabad, Telangana, India.
Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Asian Institute of Gastroenterology, Hyderabad, Telangana, India.
Pancreas Research Group, Wellcome DBT Labs, Asian Healthcare Foundation, Hyderabad, Telangana, India.

Abstract

Background: Pain is the primary symptom of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and remains a considerable therapeutic challenge. In patients with obstruction of the pancreatic duct, including stones and strictures, endoscopic treatment with or without preceding extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used for pancreatic duct decompression. The rationale for these procedures is based on the assumption that obstruction of the pancreatic duct leads to ductal hypertension and pain. However, clinical pain symptoms correlate poorly with pancreatic duct morphology, and the evidence for pancreatic duct decompression as an effective treatment for pain is based on case series and comparison between different procedures. No randomized, prospective, sham-controlled trials are currently available. The SCHOKE (Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy and Endotherapy for Pain in Chronic Pancreatitis) trial is a randomized, sham-controlled trial designed to determine if pancreatic duct decompression is an effective treatment for pain in patients with CP.

Methods: The SCHOKE trial is a randomized, single-blind, parallel-group, sham-controlled trial designed to evaluate the effect of combined ESWL and endoscopic treatment for pain in patients with CP. In total, 106 adult patients with painful CP and pancreatic duct obstruction will be randomized to combined ESWL and subsequent endoscopic treatment or corresponding sham procedures. The primary outcome is pain relief during the 3-month postrandomization period as documented in a pain diary. Secondary outcomes include quality of life and functional scores, patient global impression of change, change in use of analgesics, frequency of hospitalization, and complications. Standard follow-up is at 3 and 6 months after randomization. In an experimental substudy, quantitative sensory testing obtained before and after intervention will be used to obtain information on central pain processing and to develop models for prediction of treatment outcome.

Discussion: The SCHOKE trial investigates if pancreatic duct decompression, obtained by combined ESWL and endoscopic treatment, is effective for pain treatment in patients with CP.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03966781. Registered on May 25, 2019. Protocol date and version identifier: March 1, 2020; version 3.0.
Trials. 2020 Apr 16;21(1):338. doi: 10.1186/s13063-020-04296-0. PMID: 32299454. FREE ARTICLE

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Comments 1

Hans-Göran Tiselius on Wednesday, September 16 2020 08:30

This article is a “study protocol” of an investigation with the aim of getting information on whether a combined treatment of pancreatic stones with SWL and endoscopy results in a better outcome in terms of pain reduction than does sham treatment. The study apparently was started in January 2019 and it is assumed that it will be completed in July 2021.

Although neither chronic pancreatitis nor its treatment are matters of urological concern, it is important to be aware of the need of urologists to participate with SWL for this group of patients. Few gastroenterologists have a lithotripter or the expertise to manage this equipment.

The combined use of SWL and ERCP with sphincterotomy still is a low-invasive therapeutic approach for removal of bile duct stones as well as pancreatic stones. For urologists it is of note that these two kinds of stones have completely different radiological densities.

Hans-Göran Tiselius

This article is a “study protocol” of an investigation with the aim of getting information on whether a combined treatment of pancreatic stones with SWL and endoscopy results in a better outcome in terms of pain reduction than does sham treatment. The study apparently was started in January 2019 and it is assumed that it will be completed in July 2021. Although neither chronic pancreatitis nor its treatment are matters of urological concern, it is important to be aware of the need of urologists to participate with SWL for this group of patients. Few gastroenterologists have a lithotripter or the expertise to manage this equipment. The combined use of SWL and ERCP with sphincterotomy still is a low-invasive therapeutic approach for removal of bile duct stones as well as pancreatic stones. For urologists it is of note that these two kinds of stones have completely different radiological densities. Hans-Göran Tiselius
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Tuesday, September 29 2020

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